Strong results but more to do – Alliance welcomes Global Fund report

The International HIV/AIDS Alliance congratulates the Global Fund to Fights AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria on the impact results in its Results Report 2018. The results, released today, highlight the strong progress the Global Fund partnership has made in saving lives and supporting comprehensive HIV programmes, many of which are delivered through Alliance partners.

<p>Since it started in 2009, the Pehchan programme - funded by the Global Fund - has helped to build a network of strong and highly efficient community-based organisations. Here, a support group session is in progress at the Samara office in Bangalore, India.</p>Since it started in 2009, the Pehchan programme - funded by the Global Fund - has helped to build a network of strong and highly efficient community-based organisations. Here, a support group session is in progress at the Samara office in Bangalore, India. © Gitika Saksena for International HIV/AIDS Alliance

In 2017, the Global Fund and its partners provided antiretroviral therapy for 17.5 million people, funded 79.1 million HIV tests and reached 9.4 million people with HIV prevention services, including 4.9 million people from key populations – including men who have sex with men, sex workers, people who use drugs and transgender people.

However, the results report also underlines some extremely worrying trends in HIV, including the number of new HIV infections worldwide, which remains stubbornly high at 1.8 million in 2017, the declining long-term trend in HIV funding, and the gender inequalities that mean young women aged 15-24 in some African countries are up to eight times more likely to be HIV-positive than men of the same age.

“Millions of people with HIV around the world are alive today thanks to the hard work of the Global Fund and its partners,” said Christine Stegling, Executive Director of the HIV/AIDS Alliance. “However, despite significant progress over the last two decades, the global HIV response is worryingly off track. We must ensure that we have a fully-funded Global Fund that enables those on the frontline of the HIV response to deliver effective programmes that drive down new infections, provide access to treatment for all and address entrenched challenges such as human rights violations and gender-based violence, which are a major factor in new HIV infections.”

In 2017, the Global Fund committed approximately 12% of its HIV budget for prevention. Although this is a 30% increase on the previous year, Alliance partners are calling on the Global Fund to prioritise HIV prevention services during the next funding cycle.

“We welcome the increase in funding for HIV prevention funding through the Global Fund but the evidence clearly shows that this is not enough to significantly reduce new infections,” added Christine Stegling. “For us to change the trajectory of the global HIV epidemic, it is imperative for the Global Fund to increase its allocations for prevention activities in the next funding cycle.”

Today’s report captures significant insight into the challenges the HIV epidemic brings to countries around the world. In July, the Alliance published shadow reports on the HIV prevention landscape in six countries – India, Malawi, Nigeria, Uganda, Ukraine and Zimbabwe – which provide additional community-level information from those on the frontline of the epidemic.

The reports aim to provide an assessment of how each country is progressing against the 10-point action plan outlined in the Global HIV Prevention 2020 Road Map. Launched during the 22nd International AIDS Conference, the reports paint a picture of inconsistent engagement with civil society groups and little progress on the implementation of new accountability mechanisms that include community-based monitoring tools and initiatives.

Read the Global Fund Result Report 2018